Appreciating Social Media

It may be trivial and superficial and irrelevant and narcissistic and voyeuristic and all that, but . . . well, that’s what it is if that’s who we are.

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Envision the following scenario: you’re sitting around the waterhole with fellow colleagues and someone mentions their Facebook account, and one person says, “Huh, Facebook! Why would I want to post a bunch of shit that no one needs to know” etcetera, and then another person says “Hear, hear!”, and then another person says they’ve deleted their Facebook/MySpace account because they are so over it, and everyone sits there shaking their head at what unknown tragic end this world is coming to . . .

This seems to be kind of a common theme with some people in general–even those who utilize social media–you know, this deep-seated urge to bitch about how evil social networking is. Some kind of strange shame or guilt about posting things about yourself online or looking at other people’s info online, or something. You’ll see it in the news: the deleterious effects of the internet and how you can’t trust what is posted on-line, and how someone has been fired from their job because of a comment made on Twitter, ad nauseam.

But stop. Just stop for a minute, and think about the big picture here. Scan your brain back to 10 years ago, if you’ve been around for that long. Remember how we used to base all of our understanding of the wider world solely on the newspapers and TV? Well now scan back to now. Now, if you are savvy and Twitterized and blog literate and Facebooked and Buzzed and what have you–well, you keep up with the news of your friends and sorta friends and remote acquaintances and people you went to high school with and so forth. You see that Belinda over in New Mexico has just betrothed and has a new collection of abstract art viewable on Flickr, and you see that Zachary from your workplace is blitzed in Puerto Rico and that your cousin has a hamster that is sick and that girl from across the street that you thought was kind of cute is having her third kid, and so on and so forth. In other words, we are slowly converting over to getting our news from where it should be gotten from: from our friends.

It may be trivial and superficial and irrelevant and narcissistic and voyeuristic and all that, but . . . well, that’s what it is if that’s who we are.

Because we can still get the serious stuff from the newspapers or Google news when we need it. For all the rest of it–it’s just human nature converted into modern technology, now, ain’t it?

Author: manderson

I live in NYC.

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